Gettin’ Giggy With It

Culture

Gettin’ Giggy With It

November 29, 2018

Real Estate’s Response to the Growing Freelance Economy

We all feel it — the gig economy is growing. According to a 2017 FreshBooks study reporting that overall self-employment is likely to triple to 42 million workers by 2020, it’s more like going gangbusters. Whether by choice or necessity, millennials are leading the freelance charge, predicted to make up 42 percent of all self-employed individuals in the United States in the same timeframe. All segments of the real estate sector are responding to this seismic shift — this is a niche they want to scratch.

2501 Porter Apartments

Live-Work In Balance

Apartment renters are a key cohort of the liquid workforce. Recognizing this, apartment owners, developers, and designers are incorporating adaptable work-from-home spaces as they curate their common areas. Next-level “business centers,” these typically resident-only offerings — like the one at 2501 Porter, designed by Streetsense — are no longer defined by four walls, and include everything from mezzanine-level libraries to wired seating nooks, connected communal tables to bookable quiet rooms.

The Line Hotel DC

Jobby Lobbies

Like many other hospitality hotspots across the country, The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan is ushering in a new era of cross-pollination geared toward the creative class in the nation’s capital. The space is designed as a first-come, first-serve mixed-use hub during the day, wired for work and for leisurely lunches. The hotel welcomes the city’s growing gig-force with open arms, offering free 24-hour WiFi passes and all the free water.

Spacious_Feature-900x480

Restaurants, Revisited

Not to be left behind, restaurants are expanding their palates and making an unconventional play for the alternative workforce. In New York and San Francisco, Spacious is leveraging restaurant spaces that would typically sit empty during the day to create a membership-modeled network of wired spaces catering to self-employed tastemakers.

By Sarah Collie